HMAS Jervis Bay (GT203)



HMAS Jervis Bay 1980sHMAS Jervis Bay (GT203) was a training ship acquired after civil service as the MV Australian Trader, where it operated as a Bass Strait ferry. Acquired in 1977, it was used for navigation and seamanship training for junior officers, and as a transport for Army troops and cargo as required. Following an active career Jervis Bay was decommissioned in 1994, and ultimately consigned to scrapping in 2004.



HMAS Jervis Bay (AKR45)



HMAS Jervis Bay 2000HMAS Jervis Bay (AKR45) was a high-speed catamaran evaluated by the Australian Navy from 1999 to 2001.



M.V. Jervis Bay 1970



During 1970, a container ship of about 26,876 tons went into service and operated until the 1980's.

  ShipSpotting.com
  © Chris Howell

In January 1976 Vanquisher was sunk by Jervis Bay in Tilbury Dock (London) New Entrance, but not by colliding with her. Vanquisher was on Jervis Bay's stern line, helping the ship stern-first from the locks into the river (Thames). Once the ship was clear of the lock entrance she was turned by the tugs then went ahead on her engine. Vanquisher was caught across the ship's wash as Jervis Bay's propeller turned ahead, she was unable to get round, there was too much weight on the (manual release) hook for it to be released and the tug was rolled over and sank.

Fortunately no lives were lost, unlike in 1954 when in almost identical circumstances and in the same place, P&O's Arcadia sank Cervia with the loss of 5 of the tug's crew.

During the Jervis Bay's trip to the breakers yard, her tow snapped and she finished up on a breakwater in Spain.



M.V. Jervis Bay 1980



In 1980, a 26,750-ton container ship was completed for Shaw, Savill & Albion in West Germany. Before she commenced service as the Shaw, Savill component of the multi-corporate Overseas Containers Limited (O.C.L.) consortium she received the name of Jervis Bay. Her name was subsequently changed when many complaints were raised concerning the inappropriateness of the name Jervis Bay flying under a German flag!



M.V. Jervis Bay 1993 (formerly of P&O Nedlloyd, now Maersk Line)



The most recent MV Jervis Bay was built in 1993, a container ship of 60,000-tons.

"P&O Nedlloyd Container Line Limited was an Anglo-Dutch worldwide ocean-going container shipping line, with dual headquarters in London and Rotterdam. The company was formed in 1997 by the merger of the container-shipping interests of the leading Dutch transportation company Royal Nedlloyd (Nedlloyd Line) and the British maritime shipping giant P&O Group (P&O Containers). In 2004, Royal Nedlloyd bought the remaining shares from P&O and the company was listed as Royal P&O Nedlloyd on the Dutch stock exchange. Royal P&O Nedlloyd was acquired by the Danish A.P. Moller-Maersk Group (Maersk) in 2005 and was combined with their existing container shipping business Maersk-Sealand to form Maersk Line." (from Wikipedia)





The Museum Of Transport
in Glasgow has the original shipyard model of the P&O Nedlloyd Jervis Bay on display.

Photos compliments of John McInnes

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In 2000, we received the following e-mail from
Captain Charles Woodward, Master of M.V. Jervis Bay,..



Click to enlargeI am one of the current Masters of the P&O Nedlloyd Container Ship Jervis Bay. I have recently found your excellent website and have read all the articles with great interest. During my time on board I have been researching the story of our illustrious predecessor. The family of the late Captain Fegen have very kindly provided me with original newspaper cuttings that reported the heroic action and loss of the Jervis Bay. I have produced a small memorial to Captain Fegen and this now hangs in the alleyway outside my office on board. It may be of interest to you to know that the dining room of the Merchant Navy hotel in London is known as the Jervis Bay Room. Congratulations on your website.

Just a few observations about the current Jervis Bay. She is the second ship to carry that name with P&O Nedlloyd. Actually the first was under the Overseas Containers banner, but that has now devolved into the present company. Our first Jervis Bay was the Clyde built ship, this latest one was constructed in Japan.

I did the maiden voyage on JB(1) in 1970. She was the first of our ships to actually sail from Tilbury and complete a round voyage to Australia and back. Prior to that we had been forced to use the continental ports because of industrial action. I was a Cadet at the time and we met with some of the survivors from the original ship just before we left Tilbury. They presented us with a bell that had been rung at the survivors reunions and also a wonderful oil painting of the ship under battle colours.

We have a reproductions on board now as the original has been swallowed up by the P&O art collection. When the latest of the line came out, in 1992, the Chief Engineer on board, Bernie Jones, was the son of one of those lost in November 1940. It was a fortuitous coincidence, and he remained on board until a couple of years ago. I think he has retired from seagoing now. I have been with the ship for over four years now. At the moment we are on the run out to the Far East. We do eight week round voyages and call at Singapore, Hong Kong, Qingdao, Pusan and Kaohsiung before returning to Europe. There are plans afoot to change the run in August and we will be on the trans-Atlantic route then. I am not sure of the ports yet, but we might touch Canadian waters at some stage. The Jervis Bay connection is even stronger in my family as my partner, Caroline, has relations actually living within the bay area in Australia.



Sincerely yours, Charles Woodward Master m.v. Jervis Bay
 


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Captain Charles Woodward, Master of M.V. Jervis Bay, standing by Montague Dawson's original painting of "The Convoy That Got Through" depicting H.M.S. Jervis Bay



Relatives of crew of original Jervis Bay pay a visit to the latest Jervis Bay Dec.31.2000

 

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Vessel being towed around

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M.V. Jervis Bay

     
 

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Arriving at Thames port 31.12.00

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Stern View

     
 

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Relatives waiting to board

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Relatives waiting to board

     
 

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Superstructure

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Group in J.B. bar (note pic in background)

     
 

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Bridge

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Engine Control Room

     
 

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Capt. Charles Woodward (l) and Chief Engineer (r)
with Mike Chappell

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Engine Crankcase

     
 

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Replacement engine valves

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Engine piston & rod

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In 2012, we received the following e-mail from
Captain Charles Woodward, former Master of M.V. Jervis Bay,..



My name is Charles Woodward and for a time I was Master of the container ship Jervis Bay. I knew Mike Chappell well and we hosted a gathering on board the ship a good few years ago now in Thamesport.

The ship has now been handed back to its owners and will be crew by Ukrainian officers from now on, rather a sad time for her. When the current British Captain, Richard Noble, left the ship he kindly sent back to me the items that I had put on display outside the Captain's office. Yesterday I was able to pass these on to the RN Museum in Chatham. I'm not sure what they will actually do with them, hopefully a small display alongside the Montague Dawson painting and the wonderful ship model they have.

Just thought I would let you know.

All the very best Charles
 


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